The Spectre of Un-Patchable Hardware Haunts Us All — Don’t Meltdown!

Specter and Meltdown hacks

Ofttimes it has been difficult to explain the role of software protection in hardware-protected secure systems, but recently security researchers have helped us out by providing many examples of zero-day exploits where flaws that are baked into hardware or firmware lead to exploitable vulnerabilities in systems. In this article we are having a look at Spectre & Meltdown and explore how these attacks could have been avoided using application protection technology.

Make Yourself Less of a Target – A multi-layered Approach to Application Shielding

How the Target hack could have been prevented using Application Shielding technology

Some of you will remember the Target and Home Depot cyberattacks in 2013 & 2014, which resulted in $202 million (Sruthi Ramakrishnan, 2017) and $134.5 million USD (Roberts, 2017) of damages respectively. In this blog article, let’s examine these and other infamous hacks in detail to glean important lessons about system and application security.

Shedding light on CAP theorem for the pragmatic

In part 1 of this series of blog posts, we talked about how the choice between NoSQL and SQL databases is bound to the core design of the application and I promised to get deeper into what this means. We started by looking into how support for a flexible schema is both advantageous and challenging. In this post, I will discuss CAP theorem and explain how it affects both the choice of the database technology and the application logic. Understanding CAP theorem and its implications is very important in designing a distributed system.